Urological Science

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 123--130

Smoking behavior and survival outcomes in bladder cancer patients


Wei-Chung Chu, Chung-Hsin Chen 
 Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Chung-Hsin Chen
Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei; No.1, Changde St., Zhongzheng Dist., Taipei City 10048
Taiwan

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the survival outcomes of bladder cancer patients with different smoking behaviors. Materials and Methods: Between January 2011 and December 2014, a total of 565 bladder cancer patients were included from one institute retrospectively. Regarding smoking behavior, among these patients, 337 were nonsmokers, 52 were “quitters” (patients who had quit smoking ≥10 years ago), 54 were ex-smokers (patients who had quit smoking <10 years ago), and 117 were current smokers. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes among these four groups. Results: In this cohort, the 3-year overall survival (OS) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of the nonsmoker, quitter, ex-smoker, and current smoker groups were 75.6% (95% CI: 72.9%–78.3%), 67.4% (95% CI: 59.8%–75%), 84.1% (95% CI: 78.9%–89.3%), and 83.2% (95% CI: 79.3%–87.1%), respectively. Nonsmoker patients included a higher number of females, and quitters were older than the patients in the other groups. Larger tumors in quitters and higher clinical stages in ex-smokers were observed more frequently than in the patients of the other groups. Compared with nonsmokers, quitters, and ex-smokers, current smokers had no impact on OS (P = 0.541, 0.406, and 0.175, respectively) nor on cancer-specific survival (CSS) (P = 0.631, 0.388, and 0.193, respectively). Higher diagnostic age, being underweight, larger tumor sizes, and higher clinical stages were independent factors predicting OS. Conclusion: Smoking behavior seemed to not directly contribute to the deterioration of overall or CSS duration in patients with bladder cancer.


How to cite this article:
Chu WC, Chen CH. Smoking behavior and survival outcomes in bladder cancer patients.Urol Sci 2020;31:123-130


How to cite this URL:
Chu WC, Chen CH. Smoking behavior and survival outcomes in bladder cancer patients. Urol Sci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 May 12 ];31:123-130
Available from: https://www.e-urol-sci.com/article.asp?issn=1879-5226;year=2020;volume=31;issue=3;spage=123;epage=130;aulast=Chu;type=0