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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 51-55

Sperm retrieval predictive factors and testicular histology in nonobstructive azoospermia patients


Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Hong-Chiang Chang
Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, No. 7, Chung Shan S. Road, Taipei City 10002
Taiwan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/UROS.UROS_75_19

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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential factors for sperm retrieval prediction. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective and single-operator study at National Taiwan University Hospital. Between January 2009 and December 2017, 66 nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) patients were collected. They received testicular biopsy and sperm retrieval including microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration or microdissection testicular sperm extraction. Results: Eleven patients had normal spermatogenesis, with successful sperm retrieval (SSR) 90.9%; 21 patients hypospermatogenesis, with SSR 47.6%; 13 patients maturation arrest, with SSR 30.8%; and 21 patients Sertoli cell-only syndrome, with SSR 0%. SSR declined significantly when follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) values rise: FSH <10 mIU/ml with SSR 59.1%, FSH 10–20 mIU/ml with SSR 26.3%, and FSH >20 mIU/ml with SSR 6.7% (P = 0.003). Receiver operating characteristic curve to predict SSR by FSH achieved the area under the curve 0.792, with the best cutoff point of FSH being at 6.8 mIU/ml. Conclusion: We concluded that a higher sperm retrieval rate was statistically significantly related to lower FSH, lower luteinizing hormone, and better histology types among the NOA men. In the absence of testicular histopathology before surgery, preoperative FSH can be used for prediction and counseling. FSH ≤6.8 mIU/ml predicts SSR with a sensitivity of 63.2% and specificity of 88.2%.


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